Baseball in Baltimore

Follows Baltimore baseball over its first century, and looks at memorable players, coaches, and teams

Baseball in Baltimore

Baseball in Baltimore

Follows Baltimore baseball over its first century, and looks at memorable players, coaches, and teams

More Books:

Baseball in Baltimore
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: James H. Bready
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998-10-30 - Publisher: JHU Press

Follows Baltimore baseball over its first century, and looks at memorable players, coaches, and teams
Baseball in Baltimore
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Tom Flynn
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

Few cities can boast as rich a baseball history as Baltimore. With longtime entries in the majors, minors, and Negro Leagues, the city's core of faithful fans have seldom lacked a team to root for. They revel in the feats of their stars (Keeler, Ruth, Palmer, Ripken) and just as
100 Years of Baseball in Baltimore 1859-1959
Language: en
Pages: 16
Authors: Maryland Historical Society
Categories: Baseball
Type: BOOK - Published: 1959 - Publisher:

Books about 100 Years of Baseball in Baltimore 1859-1959
Baseball in America and America in Baseball
Language: en
Pages: 236
Authors: Robert B. Fairbanks
Categories: Baseball
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Presenting views from a variety of sport and history experts, Baseball in America and America in Baseball captures the breadth and unsuspected variety of our national fascination and identification with America's Game. Chapters cover such well-known figures as Ty Cobb and lesser-known topics like the "invisible" baseball played by Japanese
Baseball on Trial
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Nathaniel Grow
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-02-15 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

The controversial 1922 Federal Baseball Supreme Court ruling held that the "business of base ball" was not subject to the Sherman Antitrust Act because it did not constitute interstate commerce. In Baseball on Trial, legal scholar Nathaniel Grow defies conventional wisdom to explain why the unanimous Supreme Court opinion authored